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Irish Guard jokingly advises Kate Middleton on the best way to get her child to sleep

Kate Middleton received some helpful advice on getting her young baby to sleep from a member of the Irish Guards.

The Duchess of Cambridge was celebrating St Patrick’s Day at a traditional Irish Guards parade with her husband Prince William, who has been Colonel since 2011.

The Royals paid a visit to the 1st Battalion’s base in West London to watch the parade.

Kate Middleton laughs with Irish Guard

Kate observed a tradition that goes back over a century by presenting the officers and warrant officers with sprigs of Shamrocks.

Later Major Ben Irwin-Clark gave Kate a helpful piece of advice as he saw her youngest son, Prince Louis, was sleeping.

Major Irwin-Clark said that ‘a drop of whiskey in the milk’ would be perfect to help the baby sleep, before adding ‘no its a joke’.

Kate took it in good humour and later offered some parental advice of her own.

While speaking to one officer she asked whether his son was a good sleeper, before telling him: “’Oh well enjoy, it just gets better and better.”

William and Kate later went inside and enjoyed a pint of Guinness.

The tradition of presenting shamrocks to the officers of the Irish guard dates back to 1901, when the regiment was founded under Queen Victoria.

It is usually presided over by a female member of the Royal Family, with the exception of the 50th anniversary, in 1950, when King George VI presented the shamrocks.

It was a favourite event of the Queen Mother who took on the duty until her death in 2002. Princess Anne took on the role for the following decade until 2012, when the Duchess of Cambridge – whose husband is the current royal colonel of the Irish Guards – took over.

Take a look at the video below.

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