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Baby iguana’s race from snakes has got everyone talking

“Run, run! Go on little fella, go!” were the cries being shouted at television screens across Ireland on Sunday night as the baby iguana fled for its life through a gauntlet of racer snakes.

The footage was part of the incredible BBC Planet Earth II documentary that had viewers all around the world on the edge of their seats.

Baby iguanas race from snakes has got everyoe talking

One section of the programme followed the first moments of life for sea iguana hatchlings, as they emerged from their eggs on the beaches of Fernandina of the Galapagos Islands.

Veteran wildlife narrator David Attenborough tells the viewers that the first task in life for the baby iguanas is to make their way across the beach and join the adults on the rocks at the water’s edge.

Unfortunately for the babies, there are hundreds of killer racer snakes ready to catch, kill and eat these cute hatchlings.

What follows is an epic chase with the iguanas charging across the sand desperately trying to escape the slithering predators.

The life and death struggle was the most thrilling piece of footage from the opening episode of Planet Earth II, and had families, workers and schoolkids all talking about it the following morning.

Take a look at the chase for yourself.

Planet Earth II is the latest instalment of the BBC’s nature documentaries. They are always packed with incredible footage of some of the world’s most weird and wonderful wildlife, and brilliantly portray the daily struggle these creatures face to survive.

The first episode of Planet Earth also featured an island of crabs being invaded by ants, a pygmy sloth taking a swim, and two Komodo dragons battling for supremacy in order to mate.

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However, without doubt it was the baby iguanas that stole the show this week. We can’t wait to see what animals will feature next.

Written by Andrew MooreClick here to sign up to our FREE NEWSLETTER