Ireland Calling
Ireland Calling Store

1/4 of people in their 30s plan to leave Ireland

One in four people in their thirties plan to emigrate from Ireland according to a recent survey.
Image from tnt24.ie
The same number of Irish couples have also delayed having their first baby due to the financial restraints they are under. That figure rises to one in three couples in Dublin.

The state of the economy is having a major influence in the key decisions Irish people are taking in their lives. Behaviour and Attitudes, the company that held the survey, revealed that just under 25% of people aged between 30 and 39 stated that they are either ‘fairly likely’ or ‘very likely’ to leave Ireland in the next five years to pursue a more lucrative career.

Of those that plan to stay, 84% still expect to buy their own home despite the current economic state.

Banks and government aren’t trusted

Behaviour and Attitudes questioned 1,000 adults in Ireland as part of the survey which was commissioned by the Irish Independent, Evening Herald and Today FM. The survey also focused on attitudes towards the major bodies in Ireland. The banks were the least trusted group, followed by the government and media. Hospital doctors were the most trusted.

Interestingly, it was also revealed that people in their thirties tune in to Irish radio stations for the latest news and information, as opposed to the printed press, television or the internet.

The survey findings on emigration follows research carried out by the National Youth Council of Ireland which found that 300,000 people have left the country in the last four years. A quarter of Irish households have had a close family member emigrate in the last two years.

The government is worried that the ‘brain drain’ of Ireland’s finest young talent will hinder the country’s recovery over the next five years. On a more positive note, the Irish economy is showing signs of improvement. It’s hoped that this will lead to the creation of more jobs and help stem the tide of emigration which has so often plagued Ireland over the last two centuries.

Sign up to our FREE newsletters

Please click on your confirmation email,
Check your junk mail folder in case it gets sent there.

»crosslinked«

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *